EMaC Lab gets a Strategic Investment Pool Award to purchase a co-registration setup!

Growing out of our collaboration with Martín Antúnez Garcia and Harcio Barber last Fall, the University of South Florida has awarded us funds to purchase a permanent co-registration setup! We will be acquiring an EyeLink 1000Plus eye tracker and an ActiChamp/ActiCap EEG system. Get ready for more awesome eye tracking, ERP, and co-registration research coming out of South Florida in the near future!

Check out Alex Sciuto's virtual walk-through of his poster at CUNY 2020!

This year’s CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing was held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic. That means that Alex’s video walk-through of his poster (and the poster and the transcript) is available in perpetuity for your viewing pleasure at this link https://osf.io/u9ypv/. His project, which is also his honors thesis, investigates the factors that determine whether people rely on sentence context rather than perceptual input for word recognition. He finds that when words are low visual quality (i.e., in the parafovea) and when the reader has low lexical quality (i.e., is a bad speller) they are more influenced by sentence context.

Check out Sara Milligan's virtual walk-through of her poster at CUNY 2020!

This year’s CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing was held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic. That means that Sara’s video walk-through of her poster (and the poster and the transcript) is available in perpetuity for your viewing pleasure at this link https://osf.io/umzvx/. Her project, which is also her masters thesis, explores the factors that influence how people extract phonological information from words before looking at them (i.e., phonological preview benefit). She finds that phonological preview benefit requires strong expectations from the sentence context and a reader with good phonological decoding abilities.

EMaC Lab gets a Humanities Summer Institute Research Grant!

More good news for Dimitri’s honors thesis project and our lab’s collaboration with the Language and Memory Aging (LaMA) Lab under Dr. Brennan Payne at the University of Utah! The Humanities Institute at USF has awarded us a summer grant to help support the project, which investigates prediction violations in music and language, and whether musicians have higher predictive capabilities compared to non-musicians.

Dimitri Brunelle Awarded Psi Chi Undergraduate Research Grant!

Congratulations to Dimitri on receiving the Psi Chi Undergraduate Research Grant (Spring 2020) to fund his honors thesis project! He applied to travel to the Language and Memory Aging (LaMA) Lab under Dr. Brennan Payne at the University of Utah to collect EEG data alongside the behavioral data from the EMaC Lab. His project investigates prediction violations in music and language, and whether musicians have higher predictive capabilities compared to non-musicians.

Here’s a video of our “boundless bull”, Anna Marie!

A lifelong artist, Anna Marie Fennell knows the transformative power art can have in someone’s life. That’s why the USF psychology major plans to work as a mental health counselor, using expressive arts therapy to help those in need. And while she’s been focused on research and her academic success, Anna Marie has maintained her involvement in and passion for the arts – a reminder that USF Bulls are made of more than just their majors.

Alex Sciuto Awarded Psi Chi Undergraduate Research Grant

Congratulations to Alex on receiving the Psi Chi Undergraduate Research Grant (Fall 2019 round) to fund his honors thesis project! His project investigates how visual clarity and sentence constraint influence readers’ reliance on top-down and bottom-up processing. He is using a combination of RSVP and an eccentricity manipulation of a target word, and asking participants what a letter in the last word of sentence is to probe whether people are more influenced by visual input (bottom-up processing) or inferences based on sentence context (top-down processing).

Psi_Chi

2019 PsychExpo

Congratulations to Anna Marie for winning the Best Poster Award at the USF Psychology Department’s Annual Research Exposition in 2019. Her poster was on her honors thesis, and was titled “Musicians experience less working memory interference than non-musicians by utilizing syntactic structure”.

Alex also presented a poster on his honors thesis studying top-down versus bottom-up processing, and Dimitri presented a poster on oral reading.